The ADD Centre® & The Biofeedback Institute of Toronto®

Stacks Image 470

Professional Training

Stacks Image 62
TRAINING OF PROFESSIONALS

ADD Used as an example for Professional Training

In Neurofeedback Combined with Biofeedback 

A foundation for this training is the adage, “Assessment Dictates Intervention”.
The training is based on our combined 70 plus years of clinical experience with background training in Psychology, Anthropology, Education, Psychotherapy, Behaviour Therapies, Psychopharmacology, Medicine, Biochemistry, Physiology, Neuroanatomy, Electroencephalography,  Biofeedback, and over the last 20 years in Neurofeedback.


Brief Learning Objectives: 

Participants will be able to:

(1)
Knowledge: State the key surface and deep cortical sites of abnormal functioning, the neuroanatomical functions of these sites and  the symptoms commonly observed with dysfunction in these areas including: ADHD, Learning Disabilities (including Dyslexia), Non-Verbal LD, Asperger’s, Autism, Seizure Disorders, Anxiety, Panic, Depression, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, Behaviour Disorders with extreme outbursts, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, mild head injuries - concussion.

(2.)
Assessment: Recognize characteristic EEG power patterns which may be observed in these disorders in the frequency range 2 to 61 Hz (single and dual channel) and in full-cap (19 channel) assessments and in LORETA; Learn to recognize the psychophysiological patterns that reflect stress and relaxation;

(3.)
Intervention: Develop a rational intervention based on these assessments, one which combines elements of neurofeedback, biofeedback and cognitive strategies for an individualized mind-body training program. The participants will also be able to objectively consider the relative value of using one or more of: LORETA z-score NFB, Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS), Passive Infrared training (pIR) with their patient……… AND copy over updated references

This professional training covers differential diagnosis using the functional neuroanatomical basis of EEG and LORETA findings and shows how this understanding leads to prescriptions of training for disorders, alone or in combination, such as: ADHD, Learning Disabilities (including Dyslexia), Non-Verbal LD, Memory Loss, Asperger’s, Autism, Seizure Disorders, Anxiety, Panic, Depression, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, Behaviour Disorders with extreme outbursts, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, headache, Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI), Concussion, and movement disorders such as Tourette's.

Method:  Participants will view EEG samples, brain maps, 19 channel assessments that include comparisons with large data bases, LORETA, independent component analysis (ICA), and the 19 channel ERP assessment. Both Neuroguide (USA) and WinEEG (Mitsar, Russia) are routinely used to analyze data and be helped to understand: (1.) what disorder(s) they could be associated with, (2.) what would be the key symptoms given these observations that would be reported by most clients or parents and (3.) what signs would be observed by the practitioner.

You will do numerous assessments using EEG, using 1,2, and 19 channels, combined with other modalities (skin temperature, respiration, heart rate, skin conduction and muscle tension using 1, 2, and 19 channels. We will use NeuroGuide, WinEEG, LORETA, (and we may include SKIL) for the 19 channel assessment analysis.

You will partake in discussions centering on how various clinical or educational presentations (symptoms, signs, client goals) combined with the EEG (and stress assessment) findings and your knowledge of neuroanatomy and neurophysiology, can lead to an appropriate and specific NFB (& BFB) intervention.

In Conclusion:  Distinct EEG patterns are found in different clinical conditions. For example, ADHD patterns in children are characterized by high amplitudes of frontal and central slow wave activity, and high theta/beta ratios while adults with ADHD may only show high hi-beta/SMR ratios. Autistic spectrum disorders have their own distinct patterns and Asperger’s syndrome differs from Autism in its slowing in the right but not the left hemisphere. Seizure disorders, particularly partial seizures are often found in these disorders and frequently have not been previously recognized. Anterior cingulate dysfunction sometimes with Beta spindling activity may be observed in OCD, anxiety, panic, and mania. Depression may have a distinct signature with relative inactivity in the left frontal region or it may show only high amplitude high frequency beta at a number of locations.  Diagnostic problems emerge, for example, because ADHD referrals may actually have Asperger’s or even an undiagnosed seizure disorder. LORETA allows for more precise understanding of the neuroanatomical origins of the surface EEG and may, in some conditions, suggest more precise intervention to ameliorate the client’s symptoms. Surface EEG plus LORETA is helpful to clarify diagnosis and pinpoint intervention strategies.

A number of our clients are senior executives or elite athletes. These clients come to optimize their performance. How their requirements are assessed and the types of NFB, BFB, and exercises that are used to help them reach their goals will be reviewed.

Reference:
Thompson, L.,  2003, The Neurofeedback Book: An Introduction to Basic Concepts in Applied Psychophysiology, Association for Applied Psychophysiology, Wheat Ridge, Colorado
Thompson, & Thompson, L., 2006,Lessons Learned from Clinical Experience using NFB + BFB,  Addendum to The Neurofeedback Book, www.addcentre.com
 
Thompson’s Recent Publications Specifically Pertaining to Neurofeedback:

Books:
  • Sears, William & Thompson, Lynda (1998) The A.D.D. Book, New Understandings, New Approaches to Parenting Your Child. New York: Little, Brown & Co.
  • Thompson, L. (2001) Setting up for Clinical Success with the Procomp+/Biograph. Amsterdam: Biofeedback Foundation of Europe.
  • Thompson, L. (2003) The Neurofeedback Book: An Introduction to Basic Concepts in Applied Psychophysiology, Wheat Ridge, CO: Association for Applied Psychophysiology.

Chapters in Books:
  • Thompson, Lynda (2001) Neurofeedback for ADD/Hyperactivity. Chapter in The All-In-One Guide to ADD & Hyperactivity. Niagara Falls, New York: AGES Publications.
  • Thompson, Lynda ( 2003) Complementary Therapeutic Interventions: Neurofeedback, Metacognition, and Nutrition for Long-Term Improvement in Attention Deficit Disorder. Chapter in A. Fine & R. Kotkin (Eds.) The Therapist’s Guide to Learning and Attention Disorders. San Diego, CA: Academic Press.
  • Thompson, Lynda ( 2004) Electroencephalographic Applications. Module 6, Andrew Crider, Doil Montgomery (Eds) Introduction to Biofeedback: An AAPB Independent Study Program, Wheat Ridge Colorado: AAPB
  • Thompson, L. (2007) Neurofeedback for Stress Management. Chapter in Paul M. Lehrer, Robert L. Woolfolk and Wesley E. Sime (Eds.) Principles and Practice of Stress Management, 3rd Edition. New York: Guilford Publications.
  • Thompson, L., (2009) Chapter 14: Neurofeedback for ADHD. In Tom Budzynski, Helen Budzynski, James Evans, Andrew Abarbanel (Eds.), Introduction to Quantitative EEG and Neurofeedback: Advanced Theory and Applications (second edition), Academic Press, Elsevier, NY, 337-364.
  • Thompson, L., (2009) Chapter 15: Asperger's Syndrome Intervention: Combining Neurofeedback, Biofeedback and Metacognition. In Tom Budzynski, Helen Budzynski, James Evans, Andrew Abarbanel (Eds.), Introduction to Quantitative EEG and Neurofeedback: Advanced Theory and Applications (second edition), Academic Press, Elsevier, NY, 365-415.
  • Lynda Thompson, Ph.D., Thompson, James Thompson, Ph.D, Andrea Reid, M.A (In Press for 2010). Biofeedback Interventions for Autistic Spectrum Disorders. Biofeedback: A Practitioner’s Guide (4th Edition), Mark S. Schwartz Ph.D. & Frank Andrasik, Ph.D. (Editors), Guilford Press.

Articles:
  • Thompson, L. (1998) Neurofeedback Combined with Training in Metacognitive Strategies: Effectiveness in Students with ADD. Journal of Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback, Vol. 23, No. 4, pp. 243-263.
  • Thompson, L. (2002) Biofeedback for Movement Disorders (Dystonia with Parkinson’s Disease): Theory and Preliminary Results. Journal of Neurotherapy, 6(4), 51-70.
  • Thompson, L. (2003) Neurofeedback for Asperger’s Syndrome: Theoretical Rationale and Clinical Results. The Newsletter of the Biofeedback Society of California, 19(1).
  • Thompson, L., (2005) Neurofeedback Intervention for Adults with ADHD. Journal of Adult Development, Vol. 12 No. 2/3: 123-130.
  • Thompson, L. (2006) Improving Attention in Adults and Children: Differing Electroencephalograhy Profiles and Implications for Training. Biofeedback, Fall 2006
  • Thompson, L., (2009) Systems Theory of Neural Synergy: Neuroanatomical Underpinnings of Effective Intervention Using Neurofeedback plus Biofeedback. Journal of Neurotherapy Vol.13,#1, January-March 72-74
  • Thompson, L., (2010) Functional Neuroanatomy and the Rationale for Using EEG Biofeedback for Clients with Asperger’s Syndrome. Journal of Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback, Vol. 35, #1, March, pp 39-61.
  • Thompson, L., (2010) Neurofeedback Outcomes in 150 Clients with Asperger’s Syndrome and 9 Clients with Autism. Journal of Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback, Vol. 35, #1, March, pp 63-81.
  • Lynda Thompson, Ph.D., James Thompson, Ph.D, Andrea Reid, M.A (2009). Biofeedback interventions for autistic spectrum disorders – an overview. Neuroconnections Fall, pp14-22.,
  • Bojana Knezevic, Lynda Thompson (in press) Using the Tower of London to assess improvement after Neurofeedback training in clients with Asperger’s Syndrome, Journal of Neurotherapy

Other Readings:
  • Fisch, B.J., (1999) Fisch and Spehlmann's EEG Primer. Elsevier NY.
  • Baehr, Elsa, Rosenfeld, J.P., Baehr, R., Earnst, C., (1999) Clinical use of an alpha asymmetry neurofeedback protocol in the treatment of mood disorders in, James R. Evans and Andrew Abarbanel, Quantitative EEG and Neurofeedback, Academic Press, NY.
  • Hirshberg, Laurence M., Chiu, Sufen, Frazier, Jean A., (2005) Emerging Interventions, Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Clinics of North America, Saunders, Philadelphia, Vol 14, Number .1